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Nano Micro LAB

nµLab – Analytical Chemistry on the nano and micro scale

In our laboratory, we investigate, functionalise, and employ nano- and microstructures in the context of current biomedical and environmental questions. The common currency of our research is atomic spectroscopy. Especially ICP-MS has emerged as one of the most versatile element analytical techniques and offers various facets that promote the analysis of individual nanomaterials, speciation analysis as well as bioimaging of both trace metals and other bio-indicative entities in micrometre-scaled structures.

Biomedical focus: Biochemical reactions occur in small nano- and micro-scaled spaces. Investigating these spaces enables us to understand fundamental processes that impact health or are associated with pathologies. For example, the microenvironment of tumours contains information, which is useful for the classification of cancer, to predict tumour behaviour and to develop strategies for intervention. We aim to improve the characterisation of trace and major elements as well as specific bio-indicative proteins in micro-scaled structures and develop novel approaches to provide complementary perspectives that are relevant in diverse pathologies.
Furthermore, we employ functionalised nanostructures and implement them into bioanalytical workflows to enhance the capabilities of elemental mass spectrometry for biomarker analysis and ultimately to enable detection and characterisation of pathologies.

Environmental focus: Nano- and microparticles are ubiquitous in the environment. They are produced in natural as well as anthropogenic processes. While some nanostructures are hypothesised to have an important role in the early history of earth as well as for the development of life, other nanostructures have an adverse impact that threatens ecosystems as well as human health. We develop new techniques to trace, count and characterise these particles in the environment with the aim to better understand their ecological and biochemical impact. In this context, we often search for metal-based nanomaterials in urban environments with high anthropogenic pressure and further aim to improve the analysis of emerging pollutants such as nano- and microplastics.

Group Leader

Elisabeth Jenewein-Fleischer (vormittags) Claudia Fritz (nachmittags)

Institut für Chemie

Phone:+43 (0)316 380 - +43 316 380 - 5300

Office

Elisabeth Jenewein-Fleischer (vormittags) Claudia Fritz (nachmittags)

Universitätsplatz 1, 1. OG (Altbau)

Phone:+43 (0)316 380 - +43 316 380 - 5300

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